How to Get Noticed in Technology Commercialization

By Glen Gardner posted 07-06-2016 16:07

  

This is a post that first appeared on LinkedIn and probably best fits technology transfer professionals who are just starting out. However, making a name for yourself in this industry is incredibly important in landing your dream job.

 

 

Let’s face it, technology commercialization is a close-knit niche. People tend to stay, and while they might work for different organizations, they seldom leave the field. We work with a lot of clients at prestigious universities, companies, and labs and they all want experience. But experience isn’t enough to stand out among other candidates.

 

5 Tips on How to Get Employers to Ask for You by Name

Standing out in an industry filled with brilliant people isn’t easy, but there are a few ways to get known among your colleagues. If you can accomplish that, they’ll be asking for you by name.

Join AUTM

If you haven’t done so already join the Association of University Technology Managers. Next, get active on their website. Post blog posts and interact with other members. Ask people their opinions. Engage them in conversation. Attend meetings and conferences so you can network face-to-face.

Publish to LinkedIn Pulse

Write for LinkedIn Pulse. Share your ideas on the industry and encourage others to share theirs too. A thought leader not only comes up with his/her own ideas but promotes lively discourse as well.

Get Out There

Most technology commercialization departments have some sort of community program such as an Evening for Entrepreneurs. These afterhours events bring the research and corporate communities together. Even if you hate to network, go to these.

Educate

In addition to the networking at afterhours events, be a part of educating the community about technology commercialization. Help students understand how ideas can translate to research, which can then translate to patents, and sales. Become the person people seek out with questions on the process.

Listen

Make it a point to speak with entrepreneurs, investors, researchers, academics, corporations and other stakeholders about their needs. This should be a conversation outside of a specific patent or project. Listen to them and incorporate what they’ve shared in your process. You’ll be a better technology commercialization employee and a better partner for them. 

Finally, speak with a recruiter who specializes in technology commercialization. They can help you get a broad sense of what employers are looking for and then you can build upon those skills.

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